Lead

Apr 15 08 11:03 AM

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Ok, so let me finally introduce myself. I am Reasse—Uncle Lewis’s research assistant. Although I would ask who is assisting whom? For the last several months UL has been assisting me with my master’s thesis on national policy responses to emerging global sex industries. This is what has brought me to the forum. The focus of the project is on how local legalized prostitution in the form of regulation (or legal protection), and in the form of what UL would call “propaganda” (e.g. camming, pornography, etc.) increases trafficking in women for sexual exploitation globally.

My argument…

Trafficking of women for the purpose of commercial sex is a growing transnational criminal phenomenon and increasingly a large part of the illicit global economy. The sex industry, which women are trafficked in to, has been “normalized” within the global capitalist system. This allows global sex industries to expand and move freely across borders under the guise of ordinary economic activity. With the increase in trafficking, national policy makers are examining and implementing opposing feminist paradigms of abolition, regulation and prohibition of prostitution to combat the sex trade. The problem is these paradigms have traditionally been concerned with issues of morality, gender and sexuality, rather than the political and economic dimensions of human trafficking. I am arguing that human trafficking for the purposes of commercial sex is not about the autonomy of the prostitute. Rather, it’s about the global capitalist network where the supply of prostitutes legitimates the demand that traffickers profit enormously from satisfying. So my hypothesis is that legalized (regulated) prostitution provides criminal and economic incentives to traffickers to exploit women for the purpose of commercial sex with in the global capitalist system. The larger implication is its “virtual expression,” via the Internet, which is being used for the marketing of sex, the recruitment of prostitutes, and to facilitate communication between traffickers.

Many of the posts on the forum have already been very helpful in my work (and figuring all this out) so I welcome any comments you may have, or any questions for that matter. I will be presenting this in a few weeks so feedback of any kind is great.

I am sure you will be hearing from me again soon.

Reasse

P.S. Thanks UL for all your help on this!

To change masters is not to be free. -José Martí

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#1 [url]

Apr 15 08 12:07 PM


Welcome Reasse, to our online zoo..
Of course, you have already made your presence felt here since I have been posting quite a few of the pieces that your own on-line research has turned up on student prostitution ("le escorting") in France and the UK... So it's my turn to thank you for your interest, help and hard work.
UL

"I would no more be a Master than a slave. It does not conform to my idea of Democracy." Abraham Lincoln 1856.

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#3 [url]

Apr 15 08 6:28 PM

Indeed, The "famous" Research Assistant !

Welcome to your first post here Reasse and good luck with your thesis...hard topic...

Do whatever you enjoy, Enjoy whatever you do.

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#6 [url]

Jun 5 08 7:11 AM

Could I get links to the previous information you've posted here?

I actually think that people tend to confuse parts of the sex industry that shouldn't be considered in combination. For example, it is not really rational to link brothels in the US to the sexual slave trade in Turkey. I also dislike the idea of anyone discounting what individuals choose to do for themselves. The sex industry as a whole is a very complex topic and should probably be addressed in parts rather than altogether. What you find, for example, in paid texting services is drastically different than what you find in a strip club as far as how the needs of the clients are being met and as far as how the girls percieve their work or if individuals are exploited or harmed in the process (either client or worker). I've worked in various jobs in the sex industry so far - camming is my fourth categorical venture. I have done erotic texting services, phone sex, stripping and now camming. Each experience had elements that were very different and each has had things that were common. (So far, my absolute favorite was stripping, but camming is a close second). I decided to keep my experiences on the 'safe' side of the industry, though, so I probably won't go much farther than camming.

Anyhow, that is my kind of rambling-ish paragraph, I can't really comment much until I know more about what you've written.

If life was a breeze, I'd be a Hurricane Catastrophe.

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#8 [url]

Jun 6 08 12:37 AM

I agree with you. The sex industry is highly stratified and it would be unproductive to study it as a whole at the micro level. Even within its similar parts there are extreme differences--for example, experiences with “indoor” versus “outdoor” or street prostitution. To some degree I address this in the first part of my thesis, which challenges the ideology behind the abolition, prohibition and regulation of prostitution. It is difficult within the neoliberal agenda—or the extreme emphasis on the individual and freedom of choice—to make the argument that prostitution (and in this sense I do mean the entire sex industry) is not permissible when everything else is. Therefore, abolitionists rely on the idea of “forced” prostitution and do not recognize consent. This argument is difficult to substantiate, and, I believe, simply untrue. As you have attested there are a number of individuals who freely chose to work in the sex industry, and also those who attest to enjoy it. My point is that we have become so focused on the individual/consumer that we miss the global market system that allows transnational criminal networks to move freely within and above the law.

You are also right when you said that sex industry as a whole is a very complex, but I would add that it complex in the sense that there is no one set of criteria between what is legal or illegal--even within the same country. Take the U.S. for example--prostitution is illegal and social condemned (except in some counties in Nevada), while pornography, stripping, camming, etc. is legal and socially acceptable. This dichotomy becomes even greater at the global level. So what remains is a hodgepodge of legal and illegal sectors within a society that has essentially “normalized” the sex industry. As these lines are blurred the atmosphere becomes ripe for traffickers who seek out pockets of opportunity within the global capitalist system. If part of the sex trade is legal, or if the legal sectors work to generate the demand, then traffickers will take advantage. This is where my work begins—at the macro level.

At the global level there are billions of dollars to be made in the sex industry. There are even whole economies, such as Thailand, that are virtually dependent of the sex industry. There is an ebb and flow between various sectors of the sex industry, both legal and illegal, as well as between source, transit and destination countries and between those who visit counties of destination for the purpose of sex tourism. Part of my argument that I mentioned before, is that the legal sectors are somewhat of a “marketing” tool to generate and fill the global demand. The use of the Internet is a perfect example of this, which is now being used for the direct purchase of sex, the marketing of sex, and to facilitate international communication between traffickers. So I am not making an argument at all against the individual, but rather against the global capitalist who are benefiting from the “industrialization” of sex industry so to speak. This is also what I mean by exploitation—global capitalist who are using prostitution and the sex industry in the service of power and privilege. In this sense I think you can make the link between brothels in the US to the sexual slave trade in Turkey when they are all part of the larger global network. Although I do understand what you meant by this.

I hope this helps. I really appreciated your comments and I am more than happy to answer any questions you have. Your first hand experience is invaluable to me and I am interested in any further feedback you have. As for the larger work I’d love to share it with you off-line once it’s complete. I am sure UL can arrange that. Who knows? Maybe if anyone is interested, and I feel daring, I’ll post the final product on the Forum.

To change masters is not to be free. -José Martí

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#9 [url]

Jun 6 08 2:13 AM

I see, kind of like how my computer purchase ties into dangerous mining by the impoverished workers in some parts of Africa or how the immigrant boycott over a year ago in the US had global impacts.

Do you also plan on giving options for solutions to some of the issues discussed?

I admit, I kind of envy you, I hope to someday be doing similar work.

If life was a breeze, I'd be a Hurricane Catastrophe.

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#10 [url]

Jun 6 08 3:10 AM

Lol…yes, like that.

As for solutions…got any? IT’S WHAT KEEPS ME AWAKE AT NIGHT! I mean, where do you start? These are issues of gender, sexuality, privacy, autonomy, consent, morality, politics, economics, human rights, national and international law, etc. I think, for now anyway, I am content with revealing (or at least trying to reveal) the underlying mechanism that account for all these social relations. Once we can understand it as a society, and hopefully, expose the situation for what it truly is—essentially a global capitalist elite exploiting others for personal gain—then we can empower others to begin thinking critically about these issues to foster change…I would hope.

That’s why we need more people talking about this stuff. So as for doing similar work…I know someday you will. And with the value of your experiences, you’ll probably be ten times better at it then I could hope to be. In the meantime, keep posting on the Forum…the thoughts, opinions, and information you provide already are doing this type of work!

To change masters is not to be free. -José Martí

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#11 [url]

Jun 6 08 4:27 PM

Yes, I had looked at it in terms of other legal/illegal industries and there are several parallels that can be made. To begin with human trafficking, for sexual exploitation or otherwise, is now the third largest criminal activity globally rivaled only by drug trafficking and the sale of illegal arms. Even when you look at illegal drug/arms routes, human trafficking tends to follow the same patterns and often times are in tandem. In addition, the level of government corruption is also similar. Combating trafficking becomes a difficult feat when you look at how prohibitive national legislation is in theory versus practice. We see this in the case of the tens of thousands of “artist” visas issued to those who work in the adult entertainment industry. Governments know what young women are being trafficked abroad for, but there is so much revenue to be made they condemn it one respect and look the other way in another. Capitalists engaged in the sex industry would stand to loose a lot money if there were any serious attack on the industry. So in this sense transnational crime syndicates are exactly like a multinational business. The money they generate globally allows them to essentially operate with impunity.

As for supply and demand you are absolutely correct, except in this case I think we tend to loose sight of the fact that we are talking about human beings. Because of this misplaced focus on the moral and individual aspects the sex industry the network becomes invisible. What you don’t see is that the relationship is not between the customer and the prostitute, but rather between the customer and the network. It a business model where criminals provide human beings—“raw materials”— to pimps and purveyors—“manufactures”— who in turn, produces the prostitute—“commodities”—and sell it to the john—“customer.” The prostitute is essentially a product bought and sold over and over for another person’s economic gain. I know this is an oversimplification, especially when you look at how stratified sex work is, but at each level some aspect of this can be found.

What’s more important is that this economic model is different than traditional models because evidence suggests that the sex industry is supply-driven. For example, the more pornography that is produced the more that is consumed. Also, the more prostitutes that are available the more they will be frequented. So I guess it’s worth asking the question—what is the impact of a “normalized” sex industry and flooding the market with mass-produced or commodified “intimacy”? That is itself is a loaded question.

As for the impact of the actions of porn sites, models, customers, etc. that is a bit out of the realm of the political aspect of my thesis, but my personal opinion is that as a society we too quick to blame the individual. Yes, I believe in personal responsibility and I think instant gratification is an enormous part of the neoliberal agenda, which I address as one cause of this problem, but at that same time there are elite forces working with unlimited resources way beyond the impact of the individual. I know that sounds a bit conspiracy theorist, but we need to start pointing the finger where is belongs. Again, that’s not to say we don’t have any personal responsibility but I think we need to be realistic about it as well.

Thanks for you comments. I’ll keep them in mind.

To change masters is not to be free. -José Martí

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#12 [url]

Jun 7 08 5:03 PM


My thanks to all for a really good exchange of views...
BTW Reasse, I am back from Paris as of Monday.
See you next week with some really hot news about my new contacts there.
UL

"I would no more be a Master than a slave. It does not conform to my idea of Democracy." Abraham Lincoln 1856.

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#13 [url]

Jun 12 08 7:25 PM

Sorry it took me so long to return to this, I was without a keyboard for a few days and that sucked really bad. Just typing in my own chat with the windows on-screen keyboard was an adventure all by itself.

QUOTE ("Reasse")
As for solutions…got any?


I've considered a few, yes.

QUOTE
IT’S WHAT KEEPS ME AWAKE AT NIGHT! I mean, where do you start? These are issues of gender, sexuality, privacy, autonomy, consent, morality, politics, economics, human rights, national and international law, etc.


Well, you actually have to take the parts that need to be innate in your focus first and then work backwards to make any valuable proposal. I've actually done activism within the sexual information and rights realm before and have arrived at what I think are some reasonable solutions. The problem is not in finding the solutions, necessarily, it is in convincing everyone about why they need that solution. When you have people who lack understanding of the problem, it is extremely difficult to get them to understand the great need for a change. My personal ideas start from respecting the idea that people should have a right to make their own decisions about what they do sexually and understanding what parts of the issues are directly affected by things as simple as social attitudes. It is amazing the progress people can make just by changing the general attitude in the people around us. For example, eliminating extreme prejudice against a certain ethnic group may improve employment opportunities for that group provided the economy surrounding them is healthy enough to support it. If that is not the case, then you, of course, have to move on to solving that issue as well.

I have plenty of ideas on how to deal with a wide variety of problems - I just don't have the backing I would need in order to make it work.

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I think, for now anyway, I am content with revealing (or at least trying to reveal) the underlying mechanism that account for all these social relations.


It isn't a single mechanism. I wouldn't be content with just showing a cause, I'd want at least some ideas in getting the ball rolling in creating a solution.

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Once we can understand it as a society, and hopefully, expose the situation for what it truly is—essentially a global capitalist elite exploiting others for personal gain—then we can empower others to begin thinking critically about these issues to foster change…I would hope.


I really don't think the problem is as simple as that. I think this problem ties into a huge array of things such as dogmatic thought which helps to shun the industry, keeping the subjugated tied to their masters; social memes which lead to misunderstandings about the industry; politicians catering to the will of the masses in relation to the industry rather than looking for solutions; greed, but not necessarily just capitalist greed, more like the power-greed that one sees in dictatorial structures (this can happen in the sex industry more easily because people tend to not want to deal with it in a socio-political light, when that happens, nobody cares when the tzars over an industry come out - they would rather pretend it doesn't exist); there is also the matter of influences from other social issues like poverty; public health issues; international relationships between leaders and so on.

I know that before you mentioned how the sex industry follows a different sales pattern than other things that we see in a capitalistic environment. The rules of supply and demand seem to not be there. However, it seems to me that isn't necessarily the case. What seems to be happening is that the supply has yet to meet the demand. When this happens, such as with the beginning of a new and clever product that is difficult to produce, we often see a pattern where the supply seems to dictate what the demand will be. The thing that is often happening, though, is that the demand has yet to be met by the supply and so the consumers will use up what supply there is and readily await more. With something that is constantly in demand, such as food, this is especially problematic because even though a product has been purchased, it is likely that the individual will want it again later. With the sex industry already not meeting the demand completely (some demands in the industry will never be met), it is likely that we will see a pattern like you mentioned for a long time.

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That’s why we need more people talking about this stuff. So as for doing similar work…I know someday you will. And with the value of your experiences, you’ll probably be ten times better at it then I could hope to be.


I dislike measuring myself against others or having others do the reverse. There are qualities that each one of us are likely to possess that the other doesn't and so there isn't a way to make such comparisons fairly in most cases. Thus, don't devalue yourself.

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In the meantime, keep posting on the Forum…the thoughts, opinions, and information you provide already are doing this type of work!


Thanks!

QUOTE ("TRAINER")
Have you thought whether a member on a porn site has given any thought as to what their actions encompass in the grand scheme of things? Or the model that works there or anyone that works in it.


*coughs loudly*

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Have you thought how a person purchasing a porno video or someone visiting a strip club or someone calling a phone sex chat, feeds the system and some of the need for the illegal parts of it?


I am skeptical regarding people on the legal side really feeding the illegal aspect of the industry without knowing it. The average sex chat worker probably doesn't contribute to problems related to prostitution unless they are actually a Madam or prostitute themselves. (There is, of course, the matter of questioning which things should and should not be illegal as well that currently are regulated or unregulated).

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Perhaps all that the simple user,or customer, thinks about is their instant and immediate need for gratification, almost like using drugs, to satisfy their fix.


I don't think that drugs is a very good comparison point. Sex is a part of an innate drive and in light of many recent studies, orgasm itself, at least, could arguably be considered a need for one's own health.

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They do not care where this product is produced or how a woman became a hooker etc. They merely know they want it. In there lies the problem and part of the resolution.


Have you ever gone to a retail store and pondered how the cashier got there? Some stores only pay those cashiers minimum wage and in many cases, that cashier would rather be doing something else with their lives ... but it is rare that anyone bothers to consider it. What do you think things would be like if, during any encounter with a service provider, we questioned how they go there, what their story was and how to solve whatever affects that person? I've done something akin to that, though, not with everybody, and it becomes overwhelming at times. The overworked person who burns their knuckles daily while cooking burgers at McDonald's* is just as deserving of this kind of attention as the individual on cam who thinks they have better things to do.

*I'm not sure if this is what they use now, but McDonald's used to have some cookers for their burgers that had a heating element in both an upper and lower part of their cookers - the worker would put the meat on it and then close the 'lid' and the meat would then be cooked on both sides simultaneously. The problem was, though, that the lid was automated in some cases and also didn't open more than 65 degrees, making the space that the worker used entirely inadequate and leading to burns on their knuckles. Since such burns were considered minor, it took a long time for it to even be recognized as a problem.

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Even if you work in the sex industry, do the employed realize that even if they think it is ok,that they believe they cause no harm to others, that it may be supplying others to branch out or use the proceeds for other legal and illegal parts of the general sex industry.


I think this may depend on what you need. I don't think that what I'm doing causes harm to others intentionally. Although, I have banned people from my chat room in a manner that probably hurt some feelings (even though I had to do it). I doubt that my contribution to the industry fuels issues that are being brought up here like the human slave trade. Bear in mind that being linked to something in a sociological study does not make the individual a cause. This is a problematic assumption that many people make. Correlation is not causation.

QUOTE ("Reasse")
What you don’t see is that the relationship is not between the customer and the prostitute, but rather between the customer and the network. It a business model where criminals provide human beings—“raw materials”— to pimps and purveyors—“manufactures”— who in turn, produces the prostitute—“commodities”—and sell it to the john—“customer.” The prostitute is essentially a product bought and sold over and over for another person’s economic gain. I know this is an oversimplification, especially when you look at how stratified sex work is, but at each level some aspect of this can be found.


This happens in other industries as well. We sell humans as workers who do many things, just because one uses their genitals and another uses their arms, that doesn't change the overall structure.

QUOTE ("Reasse")
What’s more important is that this economic model is different than traditional models because evidence suggests that the sex industry is supply-driven.


When supply has yet to meet demand, an illusion is created that the supply is creating the demand.

QUOTE
So I guess it’s worth asking the question—what is the impact of a “normalized” sex industry and flooding the market with mass-produced or commodified “intimacy”? That is itself is a loaded question.


We can't answer that without knowing more about context anyway. There's going to be a huge difference between a no-holds-barred industry and one that has practical regulations applied.

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Yes, I believe in personal responsibility and I think instant gratification is an enormous part of the neoliberal agenda, which I address as one cause of this problem, but at that same time there are elite forces working with unlimited resources way beyond the impact of the individual.


"Neoliberal agenda" is a loaded phrase. Given the way it is often used as a term to create some ambiguity in various socio-political topics, please clarify what you mean here. Also, it makes me curious about your own political stance and what you use to decide on your stances (I hope you don't mind).

What do you think this agenda is and is it stated someplace in an objective form or what evidence do we have of it?

While I'm not a liberal in political terms, I don't think that people who are 'liberals" or "conservatives" actually come up with plans to do things that are overtly damaging to society as a whole - I think that what happens is that they are unable to think beyond what their current goals are to in order to predict the negative things that end up happening.

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I know that sounds a bit conspiracy theorist, but we need to start pointing the finger where is belongs. Again, that’s not to say we don’t have any personal responsibility but I think we need to be realistic about it as well.


We need a hundred more fingers or more if we're going to point them where they belong!

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If an alternative fuel was discovered, and oil was no longer needed, would there be a demand for the oil anymore. That product now becomes unneeded, which lower its appeal and will eventually disappear. Ok maybe not totally disappear, but its worth, its appeal would be much less. The same can hold true for humans being trafficked I believe.


Androids anyone?

QUOTE
If an alternative fuel was discovered, and oil was no longer needed, would there be a demand for the oil anymore. That product now becomes unneeded, which lower its appeal and will eventually disappear. Ok maybe not totally disappear, but its worth, its appeal would be much less. The same can hold true for humans being trafficked I believe.


We have alternative fuels but they are not in demand for various reasons. Some reasons include: 1) The turnover rate for cars is 15 years because cars are extremely expensive and are, as such, a long-term investment 2) people are unaware and/or confused due to the misunderstanding of available information (people are averse to things they don't understand or which are new) 3) In some cases, the available alternatives are more expensive and/or less convenient to produce or to meet demands.

As a result of the above, solutions to a fuel problem are not likely to result in immediate effects, but may take over a decated to see the results of. The sex trade is more immediate, if you could get rid of the demand, the industry would disappear rapidly. But how do you get rid of the demand for something that is based on an innate drive?

QUOTE
If border police,politicians, would not accept bribes, or be corrupt, would the traffickers be able to send these humans, across borders as easily


This is another issue entirely. Greed seems to be, unfortunately, a common trait in people and it is rarely the case that people will consider things beyond their current understanding or which applies outside of what will lead to their own gain. Also, some of what you mention pertains to human trafficking that is both consentual and non consentual. For example, while we may have people arriving through the states across the Mexican border, those people actually mostly seem to want to be here - meanwhile, some people sneaking in on planes from places like Turkey may be part of the slave trade. I've actually considered some things that may help in curbing the latter problem. In interviews with people who have been forced into slavery, it was discovered that many didn't think they could get help if they said anything to the other people that they interacted with. I think it was frontline who investigated some cases in Turkey where the women displayed a behavior known as 'learned helplessness' (though, the episode did not mention that term - that is the term used to reference this type of thing in psychology) where their ability to escape is thwarted by the assumption that there is no way out because early attempts or considerations for escape were unsuccessful. That being the case, things as simple as signs posted in public about how to get help if you have been kidnapped or are being forced to do something could very well benefit the individual. Add to that provisions for the government to help the person get back to safety (for those who would continue to be at risk should they simply be returned we may even have to consider things such as providing amnesty) and that could contribute significantly to at least making the trafficking more difficult. There is also the problem of individuals being more easily convinced by their captors of the nature of a situation than being convinced by outside influences. Thus, if a captor says, "I'm going to harm your mother if you escape," even if the captor does not know the individual's mother, the individual is likely to believe it. The solution to that seems to be in focusing on the education of the target group where they are getting the slaves from. Education, in this example, of the women in Turkey who are at risk of being kidnapped.

QUOTE
Just like 1 criminal would need assistance, and seek assistance from others to commit a crime, doesnt it makes sense to change or capture that one individual or change their mindset,and then the move onto the next and so on?


I would hope that there were more efficient ways to do things than just changing one mindset at a time - perhaps changing multiple minds at once? But, yes, changing minds has always been a better method of solving social issues than most other plans we've come up with, even for criminals. Recividism rates, for example, in criminals who go through behavior therapy treatments is far less than that of those who are simply imprisoned. Changing minds, though, takes a lot of effort and many people are unwilling to support things that don't give them immediate reinforcement, even from the perspective of a person voting in a booth. If all they see is the government spending money on something and the alternative is punishment oriented (something they are used to seeing) they won't favor the thing that seems to take more money and effort to gain from. This is not unlike skinners pidgeons who would favor smaller, more frequent amounts of food whyich resulted in less nutrients overall instead of greater amounts of food that they had to wait longer for.

QUOTE
Economics, societies, and people in government are also a place to begin. In order to eliminate the huge profit for a family to sell their daughter to traffickers into the sex industry for the need of money provides evidence that a government is not doing the proper thing for its citizens/


... the test of a civilization is the way that it cares for its helpless members.~Pearl S. Buck (1892-1973)

One of the biggest solutions that I can see to the things that are associated with the 'negative' aspects of the sex industry is addressing problems that are related to the needy of society. While the quote above by Buck was in reference to the elderly, it is a variation of something which is echoed in regards to many needy groups, including what Marx referred to as the Proletariate (or the "proles" referenced in Orwell's book, 1984). When you remove desperation, you can dull the effects of greed. There is fewer instances of the stealing of bread, for example, by the upper class.

QUOTE
Eliminate a young college student to seek employment into the sex chat sites because this is the only means in which they can obtain a decent wage and you will eliminate the supply.


Eliminating supply is not the solution (not that there is really any way to do that). Eliminating demand is likely to work better. Supply is not likely to be eliminated unless you eliminate the source of the supply - human beings - and that is unlikely to be a goal for most sane people.

If life was a breeze, I'd be a Hurricane Catastrophe.

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#14 [url]

Jul 4 08 2:14 AM

I should have done this a long time ago,but better late than never..
Welcome to the forum Reasse and I am sorry for the first words I ever spoke about your name you chose on here,which was not very amusing.I think that I tried to make a joke or said some smartass remark. It was about the name,not you as a person.
I sometimes say things to see how other people might respond also.
I had started studying about people being trafficked when I heard one model say she could hide within a group that trafficks women and that nobody could ever find her.
That got me wondering if people would willingly do such a thing and what might happen to them afterwards or what kind of things they would have to do for payment if they did not have cash to pay the traffickers.
I found alot of different stories on how traffickers get paid one way or another and most of it ends up being slave labor or forced prostitution to be repaid for their services.Much of which is never paid off and the people are kept as slaves for as long as they live or until they can run away or be freed.
We get alot of products made by slaves we never see and never fully understand what hardships they have to go through.
Many of the products are forced on us by our own government,since they regulate what we can and can not grow here.
I have been studying alternative sources of fuel and alternative types of transportation that need no fuel at all also which might help our country and others worldwide in the future.
About supply and demand for any product including humans,take away the demand the product is useless. People might need a little more self control in their lives instead of living in excess when it comes to sexual exploration. The more money some people have,the more thrills they seek because of boredom of seeing the money stored away in a bank isn't what makes them happy but what they do with it is the reward.
People are treated like animals being trained and given rewards for good behavior and punished for disobedience.
Traffickers use this to control people they have and some rules on cam sites do the same thing to their models to keep them in line.
I would even say this applys to most jobs where you work for someone else.
The best way to stop the abuse of people by traffickers is to impose more strict laws against trafficking and especially against forced slave labor and forced prostitution or anything like these.Current laws give just a slap on the wrist for traffickers of this type and 10 years or less does not seem appropriate or just. How can anyone put a price on anyones lost life or sanity?
I also do not think you can stop peoples primal urges or lust which leads to improper use of other people sometimes.Every person has their own choice of how they are going to respect each other as a human being.
You can not force people to change,they have to want to change or put laws in place that fit the crime and enforce them as much as possible.
People need to stop saying they do not trust government and then not get involved in voting .You are not going to change government,policies made by government or anything else in your city,town or country if you do not get involved with it or participate.
Anyway,I wish you luck on your studies and hope that some good has or will come of it Reasse..

Money is like manure; it's not worth a thing unless it's spread around encouraging young things to grow. Thornton Wilder


You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

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#15 [url]

Jul 7 08 1:02 AM

hmm. I looked back at that Birthday Post UL did for your BDay Reasse.. and I guess I did not make fun of your forum name UL did in his post or as I said a typo error.. lol.. I hope everyone is enjoying the warmer weather for now..Ohh and the model that I heard talk about trafficking gangs,I was not sure if she was saying that to get chat stalkers to leave her alone or if she was actually telling the truth about how she could dissapear and nobody would ever be able to find her.. I would guess it's a hide and seek that most people would not want to get involved with unless their family ran or runs the trafficking business. Who knows.. I don't.
Take care..

Money is like manure; it's not worth a thing unless it's spread around encouraging young things to grow. Thornton Wilder


You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

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#16 [url]

Jul 18 08 6:21 PM

Hi Tim,

Thank you for your comments (and don’t worry about the sarcasm, I can take it). I agree with everything that you said, especially that traffickers should receive harsher punishments. They are the primary perpetrators and are often overlooked because they are “invisible” within the system. Human trafficking is a lucrative business and with little chance of being caught, and minimal sentencing if prosecuted…the rewards far outweigh the risks. In my opinion this is what government policies need to focus on, and like you said, citizens should hold their feet to the fire. Apathy or distrust of the government only empowers the traffickers who have found legal channels to support the trade. Once it enters the legal economy, and mainstream capitalists begin to profit (and this is not just limited to the sex trade but what we eat, wear, consume, etc.) the government, as we have so often seen, becomes beholden to the interests of capital. One interesting idea that I have been thinking about lately is that we are no longer a nation of citizens, but a nation of consumers. Like you said, people need to exercise more self-control with regard to sexual exploration or otherwise. It seems to me that our power as citizens has been reduced to our power as a consumer and we should leverage it in the interest of justice.

On thing I did want to mention though was your comment about “primal urges”. While you can’t deny the biological drive towards sex, demand can be, and is, socially constructed. People are made to feel they want or need something, and this is especially true with regard to sex because it capitalizes on a biological urge. But not to the extent to which it has pervaded our culture, or the level of cruelty that it has come to. We are induced to feel that it is acceptable or that it’s what we want because it makes us purchase more without regard for, or putting thought into what we are purchasing. So yes, quelling the demand, in this case to save the “product,” is necessary. However, due to the forces behind our need to express our individual rights, and our need for immediate gratification, changing the law may be the only thing to accomplish that.

Thanks again for your comments, and I hope some good comes of my thesis as well.

Reasse

To change masters is not to be free. -José Martí

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